Scrapbooker's rivets for elastic straps/pen loops/page markers?

Has anyone ever used a eyelets -- as are used by scrapbookers -- for holding on a hacked elastic strap or other binder accessory? I found a (manual) eyelet tool at a local discount store for far less than the local craft mart is asking, but of course passed it up, only to think of myriad uses on my own homebrew covers:

* Fasten ends of elastic loop on back cover to make a moleskine-like loop for holding binder shut

* Attach nice ribbon(s) to back cover near spine to act as page-finders or ad-hoc bookmarks

* Fasten elastic to make a custom pen loop

The eyelets I've seen are pretty small, only meant to hold two sheets of paper together, but the sewing section of said craft-mart has many different sizes of the things, so my brain is turning over and over hmmmm...

I don't sew, and I object to using duct tape for my professional binder(s) out of pure style snobbery. :-)

Thoughts?

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I have

See here on Flickr.

Ah ha!

That's exactly what I had envisioned. What size is that eyelet? The punches I saw in the scrapbooking section were very, very tiny, but I saw others in the sewing section that were meant for going through cotton denim fabric. I'll have to look more closely at what's available when I go back.

Let me check...

Inside diameter: 5 mm
Outside diameter: 8 mm

"It's better to be a pirate than to join the Navy." -- Steve Jobs

Canadian Tire

Incidently, I bought my eyelet kit at a tool store.

"It's better to be a pirate than to join the Navy." -- Steve Jobs

OOo!

I haven't had reason to suspect that the local auto parts store was hiding planner supplies. I will have to investigate! The crafty eyelets did look a little small/flimsy for something that will be taking a lot of abuse and potentially holding a few layers of material.

So I investigated

...and I'm now the proud owner of a grommet kit: punch, setter, block of wood, and 48 grommets for attachment happiness (hammer not included.) The whole deal cost less than what the craft superstore wanted just for their fancy setting tool, and I know these will last.

Thanks again for the tip!

Does it have...

a Wallace accessory to go with the Gromit ?

The were-rabbit made me do it :)
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"I think the surest sign that there is intelligent life out there in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin and Hobbes/Bill Waterson)

Yé!

Eeee

"It's better to be a pirate than to join the Navy." -- Steve Jobs

If I could...

figure out a way to put a big Wallace-banana-grin in here, this is where I would do it

:D
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"I think the surest sign that there is intelligent life out there in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin and Hobbes/Bill Waterson)

crackers!

I'm just crackers about cheese!

-Kenny

What?

No Wensleydale? Come on, Gromit!

Not Wensleydale

The latest W&G chesse is Stinking Bishop, which is made in a small dairy about 50 miles away from here. :-; (That's a lip-licking smiley.)

and now

you guys are just making me hungry for cheezy....
and i don't have any here at home.

bah!
/innowen

crop-a-dile

You can read a review about this tool at the link below.
http://www.scrapjazz.com/reviews/1791
The Crop-A-Dile will even punch and set through chipboard or CDs. I usually wait until I can get a 40 or 50% off coupon for the local Michael's Craft store before I buy the more expensive tools. Large craft or scrapbook stores will have a better selection of eyelets in different sizes and colors.

Magzy

Hmmm

Reviews are generally positive, although it seems like you're limited to the "depth" that you can punch from the edge, as this is a hinged-type tool, instead of a hammer-type punch. I'll have to think about what I plan on using this for.

A little more searching online finds grommet and snap setting tools at my local hardware store, which are meant for canvas repairs. This sounds like what Tournevis used.

Quiet-ness isn't as important to me, as I plan to assemble the grommety bits at home, and ideally only once. Looks like I'll need to clear out a box to hold all the supplies, though. :-)

Great suggestions, everyone!