Perforating corners

I searched and found a couple of discussions on perforating corners but no great solutions so far. I love the perforated corners on the Levenger planner pages. It's a curved perf that you tear off each week/day/whatever so you can open easily to the current week/day/whatever. Has anyone found a corner perforator yet for diy perfs?

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I've seen interchangable

I've seen interchangable head for paper trimmers that will perforate, but nothing that will do corners directly. I had a similar idea a few days ago and just assumed you could find one right next to the corner rounder punches in stationary/crafts stores, but I guess not.

If you think you could be accurate enough, you may be able to use the paper trimmer across the corner of the page, but I think it would be hard to do well, and certainly wouldn't be as convenient as the corner rounder punches I have seen.

Another option I spotted while googling was to make a stencil and use a paper piercing tool to punch the holes manually through the stencil. I think this would be a little slower, but easier to be accurate with, and you could make rounded perforations like the levenger punch.

If anyone knows a place where you can design/make custom punches I'd certainly be interested in knowing. I've had a few punch ideas that I just haven't been able to find anywhere. The only one I can remember now is a tab punch that will punch a tab shape out of the top of a piece of card - the only tab punches I saw were ones that would punch a tab shape out that you then stuck to another page, but I'd like something where you can cut your own tabbed dividers/mini file folders without having to glue something extra on, and without using scissors (I am really bad with scissorss).

Jon's solution...

I've been looking for this for about five years and have come to the conclusion that it just isn't out there. But then Jon suggested a method that is free, doesn't require you to carry around any equipment, and works perfectly. I've been using his method ever since and am very happy with it. If I found a perforator now I don't think I'd want it!

Jon's solution is in node 4500. Sorry I'm not good at putting in the links, but you can search for "perfed corners" and I'm quoting it below:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
The "natural" solution...

Fold over the corner, and crease it really well, then moisten the crease with your tongue (or moist finger?). Wait a second and then tear. The moist paper rips very cleanly--and you have your corner "cut" off...

I used to do this all the time making paper airplanes. Actually, you get a straighter edge doing this than with scissors. Once it's dry ;-) nobody will know the difference.

-Jon
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Works great! I use the moistened finger. And moisten both sides of the paper. It has become part of my weekly review and marks the end of the old week and the beginning of planning for the next week.

The old way of doing it

In the 1950s, when you wanted to diy show tickets that had perforated stubs, or corners, or whatever, you used a sewing maching and passed the paper through. I've done it myself several times and it works well. You want perfed corners, pass the corners under the needle of a sewing machine!

page finder?

I do really like the perforated corners, but find that the way I use my planner the only really served one purpose: to quickly find what page you're on. This week in the case of a weekly planner and the next page in your notes. For Circa notebooks and just about any kind of planner you can get page finders.

That being said, if anyone finds an inexpensive, easy way to make corner perforations, I'd love to here it.

-Kenny

DayTimer(R) pages

Actually, the perforated corners on Daytimer's(R) 2-page-per-day series rock. They put the date in the tear-off part, so just glancing at your Daytime(R) calendar closed, you are reminded of the date, or, if you forgot to tear off yesterday's, are reminded to do so. ;-)

That was the one thing that kept me with that format for years after I didn't need it. Tear-off corners on other formats just aren't the same (though I still did it with bound books, where the page finders don't work.)

-Jon

A couple of options.

Hi.

If you have a rotary paper trimmer (like a Carl) you can get perfing blades for it. It will cut through 10 sheets at a time, you just need a jig to line your corner up right.

If you have a hand-held rotary paper cutter (like those used for sewing) you can get a perfing blade for that (Fiskars has two sizes of cutters). This would allow you to perf a gentle curve as long as you have a curved item to run the cutter around (like a jar lid or a stoneware coaster).

There is a corner 'slitter' in the scrapbooking section that punches two slits diagonally on a corner--you might have to mail order it, but I found it on the internet. It cuts the slits *almost* all the way across the corner, so it ought to be easy to just pull off the corner when you're done with the page. This gadget probably only cuts one sheet at a time, though.

There are also other punches that might suit the purpose. There's a border punch in a 'rope' pattern that might make a corner easy to remove, but it's not intended for corners. There are also corner punches you could just carry around, and when you're done with the day/week, just punch the corner to remove the material. An ordinary corner rounder would work fine for this, it removes enough material to allow the quick flip that folks want.

About $9 at Target will net you a very small swiss army pocket knife containing a pair of mini scissors. I have had one of these for many years and I use them constantly for everything. I clip my nails, open packages and boxes, shorten mini-blinds, trim my kids' nails, shorten drinking straws at restaurants.. They are tremendously useful and would certainly cut the tag end off a planner page. :) If you want to make sure all your trimmed corners line up, just print a diagonal line on your pages as a guide.

shris