How do you back-up your non-digital planner ?

How do you back-up your non-digital planner? A tech-head friend who snickeringly says he understands my switch from a well-worn Pocket PC to a self-drawn Moleskin planner asked me what my plans were for backup. I said none, he said I'm living dangerously. He's probably right. I could photocopy my month views once a week, which would be pretty painless. What do you do to back-up your planner?

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Go Digital!

Well, I hate to say it, but the only analog solution I see is to handwrite another copy. I'd say you need to make a photocopy, or if you have a scanner/multifunction printer, scan the pages and save them digitally.

Perhaps you could handcuff your planner to your wrist to avoid losing it, like the old briefcase trick. ;-)

Good luck - I'm curious to see other suggestions.

Reese

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Curse you, Reese Witherspoon! It was a GUYS name first!
It's REESE, like Reese's Peanut Butter Cups
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definitely redundancy

That was how I did it when it was essential to my life. Actually, I _did_ lose my DayTimer. It was the Classic size leather binder. I stupidly put it on top of my car while putting my son into his car seat on the way to work. I drove off with it there. It had all kinds of important work data in it, and was essential. Thankfully, a kind soul found it, and dropped it off at the info desk at work. (whew!). After that, I tended to keep multiple copies of important things like schedules and contact lists.

It _is_, of course, easier, if you have a digital version and an analog version, but if it's analog-only, I would suggest either scanning on occasion or xeroxing your pages, no more than once a week, I guess. Or, use a more "sloppy" version for your initial schedule items, and re-write them into the final book. I used to have a list for scheduling, written in pencil. Later, I would computerize them, and print that out. Alternately, I penned them into my main calendar (usually as an interim until the next printout--once a month). I also always add new names to my address book on my computer--which ought to be done, IMO, at least if your address book is essential to your work.

So, there are multiple ways of doing this. Mine are just one man's thoughts.

-Jon

I know someone who did the same thing

A friend of mine did nearly the same thing. Went on a walk in the park with his wife. They were planning out their goals for the rest of the year. He put the planner on top of his truck, got distracted by something and then hopped in & drove off. Sadly, no one returned his planner.

I'd say you have 3 options that may work: 1. photocopy and/or scan everything 2. Do everything on the computer and print it out for your planner 3. Do everything in your planner and then hand-enter the really important stuff into your computer.

What would be wonderful is if you could scan hand-written pages and have them show up as plain text. Anyone know if some OCR systems handle this?

-Kenny

Outlook

I use Outlook for my calendar - print it and paste it in my notebook that I carry with me. At the end of the week or month, whatever I have written into the book, I type into Outlook. Digital and Analog. This has been the only way I have been able to merge the two... Can't wait to read more of the posts on this subject! Always looking for new and improved ideas!

Oh yeah, scanning !

Scanning my book is a great idea. I forget from time to time this printer 2 feet away can do that. :-) I'm not going to waste time re-writing everything a 2nd time or type it into a computer app. so scanning is a super reminder.

scanning?

But how often are you going to scan? Every page every day? Assuming you make additions to your calendar daily, you'd need to. It seems like this would be more work than just keeping two calendars.

I use Outlook (backed up by a server) and a smartphone. I print my weekly calendar to have a week at a glance. Paper still accounts for a large part of my planning, but I need my calendar backed up. I couldn't sleep otherwise.

Easy to scan daily

In my line of work it'll be easy to keep track of which months from a day's work need to be re-scanned. Day to day there are few big changes. Takes about two minutes to do one scan and organize the output. Hey, I'm admittedly getting away from the Pocket PC so this is a grand experiment. EDIT: 12/29: I'll carry some Post-It Tabs and tab a month I need to re-scan at night.

Backing up analog information

Interesting and important thread for all of us whose lives are bound up in our Day-Timers or similar and who dread the day when we forget it somewhere.

My low-tech solution has been my digital camera. It has a text setting, and I simply use that setting and take a closeup photograph of the relevant pages in my Daytimer. That way I have legible images of my address list, frequently called numbers, etc. as files on my PC. When the inevitable day comes when I misplace the paper, I will be able to retranscribe the information from the .jpg images.

That said, I'm trying to put off the day when I lose my day planner as all that rewriting will no doubt have me gnashing my teeth!

Planner = Calendar + other stuff

Hi.

My calendar is humanly-synched with my work Outlook.

Regular reminders (birthdays etc.) are in a spreadsheet where I can mail-merge them onto my paper pages. These are not synched with Outlook, but the spreadsheet is the backup/original depending on how you look at it.

Contacts are entered into an electronic document (I think it's in Word, but it might be OOo Writer) and printed for insertion into my planner, they are updated rarely. There are a few pencil marks in my paper planner, but these will be incorporated at my next size switch. :)

My tickler was originally generated as a mail merge, so I could reprint all my chore cards and plot them again if needed, but these never leave the house.

My project cards stay in the house--any really critical data about projects is kept on the work computer, these are only handwritten notes that usually get converted to an emailed summary after the meeting anyway. So there's nothing really earth-shaking there.

The part that would be the hardest to recover if lost is my password hint book. That's handwritten and there's only one good copy--I do have an older copy that would get me back up and running on 90% of the passwords I use, but the 'current' has no backup. I should scan that. :)

So, basically the strategy is that data should be printed out and bound for use, for the most part. Handwritten notes are the exception, rather than the rule. The few calendar items that get hand-written originally are doc appointments and the like that get entered into Outlook later. I don't output from Outlook--I just make sure there are double entries.

shris

"$50 reward for return to name, address, phone number

I left one of my planners in the shopping cart in the parking lot at Sam's Club. Someone found it and turned it in at the service desk. I hadn't written any identification in the notebook! Luckily, some pieces of scrap paper tucked in the front were from a torn-up piece of junk mail with my name and address on reverse side, and the conscientious Sam's employee looked me up in the membership roster to obtain my unlisted phone number, and called me to say they had the notebook at the service desk.

Now I make sure that any notebook which leaves my house is clearly marked with my name, address, phone, plus "Please Return" or "$50 reward for return".

$50 Reward!! Excellent Idea...

In the search for the perfect system, i have thought of backups...
But unfortunately not losses like that...
Perhaps because i am still a bit traumatized over prior losses...
The irreplaceable things...
Baby pictures and the like...
But i will now defintely add a reward to my various systems....
With info on how to find me to return it...
The thought of some stranger thumbing through my musings is not as disturbing as having that same stranger return the item(s) with a knowin smirk...
*sigh*
I do write very tiny...
Partly because my handwriting is neater that way...
But mostly to discourage people from snooping...
I use 2 software programs...
And i am really excited about merging the two programs with my new Staples Rolla Notebook to achieve true effectiveness and order in my life...
One of the programs is a journaling program...
And as much as i love it...
I was hesitant to really use it fully...
As that would mean possibly leaving precious info behind when i leave the house...
Or having to lug my 17" widescreen laptop around to have that info...
But with the Rolla Notebook i can actually print out the relevant info and bring it with me...
Backups of the Notebook itself though...
Now that i hadn't even considered...
And i thought i had thought of every contigency...
I suppose i could scan my pages into the relevant programs...
I write small enough that that wouldn't be a major inconvenience...
I settled on the letter size of the Rolla Notebook for journaling, planning, organization, note taking, drawing and more...
Maybe a speech to text program...
Possibly pay a kid to talk to the box for me...
hahaha...
I've also been toying with the idea of that to get my old journals added to my journal program...
But the Rolla Notebook actually seemed a more attractive alternative...
As i could simply punch the pages and compile them into one or more large books...
Or perhaps just going to a copy center and copying everything for a group rating...
Then compiling that as a backup safetly at home in a fireproof safe
*laughs*
Yes this is a very good question....
I will definitely have to figure something out...
I will definitely be watching this thread to see if any viable options turn up...

"The early bird may get the worm, but the late rising worm lives."

post its, cpu, and digital camera

I hope this might be useful for someone...

this comes from wanting to throw myself into the river when many years ago, I put my only draft of my dissertation on the roof of my Pinto, in a windy rain storm, while holding umbrella and putting my little child in the car ...I then got in and zoomed off... only to glance in the rear view mirror and see my pages flying ALL OVER the highway and into the ditches. Pull car way over, out on road like a maniac, chasing flying paper, down into muddy ditches, over the median, wet like a drowned cat. Caught most of them without being run down by 18 wheelers. But, typewritten pages on onionskin dont stand up to water. It was such a terrible day.

So, here are Archangels Rules for the Road

Anchor an automatic cross check next time you get in your car and put the key in the ignition. Tell yourself, When I put key in ignition, I ALWAYS WILL check at the same time, with my eyes and hands, to see if
a)all children are present
b)all things I just bought are present
c) daytimer is present
d) Purse is present
e) computer is present
f) phone is present
g) reading glasses are present
h) favorite pen is present
i)other valuable thing is present
j) notice I did not add, mind is present...lol

There is NO good reason to make an airplane pilot stop making checks and cross checks for safety's sake before taking off, and we ought to do so too. We should. We're dealing with the most precious, irreplaceable parts of our lives, speaking of children and 'the book' and the well of identity: the bottomless purse, briefcase, backpack, or bursting wallet

Anchoring means touching the key in the ignition and then turning to touch the people and things that you want to make sure are with you. Anchoring, in psychology, also means looking at the key in the ignition and then LOOKING at each precious being and object to make sure all are settled in the car. After a person does this a couple times, it becomes automatic, and it would be hard to see the car key in the ignition and not think, where are all my kids, my book, my purse, etc.

Anchoring is akin to Pavlov's work in one way. One is rewareded with a better sense of security, when one 'rings the bell' and turns to see if all people and things needed and loved, are present.

On earth, it appears that human beings are motivated a great deal... by love.
This anchoring is based on that. On what one cherishes most.

I hope you will try it. Remember, the senses are what anchor memory, in this case, touch and sight.

archangel

I call my "procedure"...

... the slapdown. I slap down my pockets for keys, and my belt for my phone and Palm. ;-) Also, I no longer leave things on top of my car.... I've lost too many things.... which form my "Pavlov's salivating".... If ever I start to put something on top, I immediately remember my Newton, Daytimer, and a couple cups of coffee, and my wife's Bible (she did that one) fluttering away... and I immediately change my mind. ;-)

When I get out of my car, my one habit is to _never_ shut the car door without holding my car keys in my hand. It's so strong now, that I absolutely _cannot_ shut the door. It's weird to watch, as my family can attest. ;-)

-Jon

"the slapdown." I love that.

"the slapdown." I love that. I could just see you doing 'the slapdown.' It's gotta be a dance. All together now..., 1,2,3 lol

you know, everyone here who has posted that they lost and found daykeeper, papers, etc, or lost and didnt find, while I was reading those stories, my heart really felt for them. In pysch, the things we find most dear are called 'self-objects'... meaning some things in our lives seem like extensions, blood and bone, of our actual selves. If we lose them, it's disorienting, stunning, fearful, angering.

just my .02 cents worth. To me it makes sense that people become crazed and depressed over losing a book/daytimer/other close in object, like a special ring or coin, or et al

Humans have a strong drive to be close to meaning.

archangel

Psych or no...

but for me, it's not the object itself... To me, the objects themselves are quite replaceable, and worthless... It's the _information_ they contain that is priceless to me! My DayTimer had work info and schedules. My Newtons contained notes, and other data that had not been backed up, as well as notes that dated back for years--none of which was accessible without my Newton. I've known speakers to lose their schedule books, and suddenly be unable to make commitments, because they had only _one_ copy of their schedule! Now, _that_ is heartbreak!

I think this is true for most people who don't wish to lose their planners or PDAs. . . It's not the intrinsic value of the hardware, but the irreplacability of the information. Oh, and the slapdown is just to make sure I'm complete with those necessary things to get things done--phone, keys, Palm, etc.

-Jon

"object' in the old sense of the word

sorry, i should have been more clear Jon. In what i've read about object-relations psych, 'object' doesnt mean an object as in the hardware or mechanism, it means the meaning within something, carried or assigned ... important meaning, or set of usages ... "Object," as in its earliest meaning... "to present something to the mind."

I waas thinking the importance of data that is dearly needed in one's life could stand under this category. Just my .02 cents worth.

archangel

exactly

While it is disappointing to lose a pristine new planner, it is devastating to lose a half full one. Mine does become a brain-dump for me. So when I lose it, I have lost a piece of myself.

I do the slap down too. For me it includes back pockets. My SO says it looks like I'm patting myself on the butt. I'm kinda glad I don't see that. :)

-kmorris

Me Too !

I do this too, Jon ! I look like a cop checking myself for contraband. I should say "Watch your head" as I put myself in my back seat. :-)

sorry, I put wrong header, other post should be 'anchoring'

this post should be post-its notes, cpu and digital camera

how I back up my handwritten daytimer

I write all down on post-it notes

i only put one item on each post-it note.

Then, I post them by hand to appropriate page of my 'books'

I save all the post-its in a basket.

I only write in 'books' if it is first on a post-it note or in computer.
cpu has auto backup, so whatever I put into it, stays .
That's it.

Except for manuscript pages w handwritten pages, drawings hand colored. I use isight or digital cheapo camera to take pix of the pages, then store images on computer...

I burn some plastic every few days, just to make sure, as writing is not just my work, but more.

Between all this, and Circa/rollabind/atoma's capacity for moving pages around at will, I feel blessed to live in a time when the means for writing, ideating, organizing is so much skilled craft... like all of you. Craftsmen and craftswomen, all.

I also only write on ONE side of any page in my journal/daybook, so I can move the pages without losing shape or sense of what came before or after.

I hope this helps someone

archangel

analog/digital clipboard

heh heh heh . . . got just the thing.

What you need is a one of these.

...dave
insomnia cure

Tad big for my pocket

Just a tad too large for hands-free carry. :-)

Digi-Clipboards

They all need special paper or a special pen or both.

And I have yet to see one that has Mac software :(
-----------------------------------
"I think the surest sign that there is intelligent life out there in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin and Hobbes/Bill Waterson)

no mac

special pen but standard paper.

no mac support - rats!

but I'm thinking maybe for my office where we are windoze based.

...dave
insomnia cure

Hmmmmm... This has some potential..

The mac issue isn't a problem for me as i use windows...
Even the size isn't an issue...
I usually carry an 8 1/2 by 11 sketchbook around anyways...
So i opted for the letter size Rolla Notebook...
That way i can have an all-in-one that is versatile and can grow with me...
Later i will splurge on the Levenger Circa products...
Do you use this?
And if so, how do you go about Circa-fying it?
I see that this uses Evernote...
That is one of the software programs that i currenty use heavily...
Perhaps prepunched the paper and simply use this and file into the circa or rolla notebook when finished...
Or just punch it afterwards...
I'm envisioning products in my head now that aren't even available yet to make this work...
Story of my life...
*sigh*
But i could put something together easily enough...
I wouldn't have to scan my drawing anymore either...
And i hadn't even considered backing up writings....
Let alone the drawings...
So that would be a bonus...
Scanning drawings can really be annoying...
I'd have to see it in action though...
The handwriting to text is a very nice feature...
That is why i love my pocket pc...
But technology hasn't yet caught up to what i want yet...
*heavier sigh*

"The early bird may get the worm, but the late rising worm lives."

The quote & devices

You mean to quote Shel Silverstein's poem? ' If you're a bird, be an early bird, but if you're a worm, sleep late. '

I've stayed away from the digitizing pen devices. I once considered them since I was doing so much on computer, I wanted to complete the circle and get it all digital, including my daily note-taking. But no matter how hard I tried (portable computers, tiny computers etc) I could not get away from written notes. Finally my quest led me in the opposite direction, returning to paper, so here I am - here.

I concluded that the maintaince of the digital pen device is not any better or worse than simplying scanning if you want to capture something. But I may be mistaken since I never shelled out the money.

Nowadays I sometimes scan or photocopy important pages (I have fast scanners at work, a solution I know won't help most people here). But, in fact, I find most of my information is recoverable - I keep some redundancies in 3x5 notes and in Outlook, and my action lists can be reconstructed. You might want to seriously evaluate how much time you really want to spend with some kind of complex back-up scheme.

Re: The Quote & Devices...

Shel Silverstein's poem?
Dunno... ((shrugs))
Never heard of him/her...
I'll have to look into it now...
I just like quotes...
So every now and again i go hunting for them...
Via the handy dandy search engines...
That's how i found this one...
I found it amusing, so i use it...

Yeah.. i think eventually i will go totally digital...
Once technology catches up to what i really want...
I do have my eye on the origami...
And the combo tablet pc/pocket pc...
Yes i am also a gadget junkie...
I love my pocket pc...
But it is outdated so won't talk to my laptop...
For me paper will never go away though...
Cuz i love drawing and writing...
I will eventually get a wacom pen tablet...
So i figured that this pen and pad device could be a cool thing on the fly...
But i realise i'd be limited to whatever pen comes with the device...
That could be problematical...
I prefer an extremely fine point for both drawing and writing...
So I'd have to actually test it to see if it would work for me...
But in theory...
Reminds me of someones quote that i saw on here...
it was something like...
"I want to live in theory... everything works there"
Anyhoos...
My scanner is very good...
I just need to do some more tweaking to get better scans...
Less gray tones and all...
I just never had considered the need to back up my journal/planner... *sigh*
So i am definitely takin notes here...
i don't have Outlook...
And honestly i don't know much about it or what it does...
But i do have some programs that have some scheduling functions that i will have to revisit...
All in all, scanning so far seems to be the best option for me...
That way i don't have to go and buy anything new...
Especially since i wanna upgrade from the Staples Rolla notebook to the Levenger Circa...
I agree with your points though..
Thank you very much ((smiles))

Another possible option for some is a voice recorder of some type...
Most people nowadays have an mp3 player...
Or even a voice recording function on their pc...
I used my voice recorder all the time on my pocket pc...
And if you tweak the settings, with an sd card, it really doesn't even put a dent in the available memory...
I believe i got mine to record at 2kbps...
I could check that though for anyone who is interested...
And i even had a hierarchy of folders so i could more easily find what i was looking for...
I actually used a combination of notes/voice memos...
I don't anymore because i need to update my pocket pc...
I currently can't sync with my pc...
Perhaps I could find something to make it work...
But i just haven't bothered to do so...

"The early bird may get the worm, but the late rising worm lives."

Wall calendar

My planning system is less cohesive than some thanks to the nature of my work.

I have to use Outlook at work. The orgnaisation I work for is very large and very bureaucratic, so my personal planning is about getting as far away from lots of bureaucracy as possible.

My planner is a week to a page pocketsized moleskine, with a print of the current month's Outlook work calendar folded and shoved inside the front cover, and a Fobster for contact info etc.

My backup for the diary is a wall calendar at home that has appointments, birthdays and events scrawled on it. It's added to once or twice a week by my husband or myself. Anything extremely important that's in my Fobster (eg a big task, new phone number for a friend etc) is copied into the notes pages of the Moleskine, and copied onto the calendar if it's something that my husband needs to know.

I've pared down to this system as I found that I was creating weekly and daily pages and lists for the sake of it. But all I was doing was filling in lots of pages that I didn't look at again ... and not actually getting anything done.