Welcome to DIYPlanner.com!

We are a community of people who see the value of paper as a medium for planning, productivity, creative expression, and exploring ideas. We encourage visitors to share advice and inspiration, and we love to see submissions for templates, kit images and story articles. We are also the official home of the free D*I*Y Planner kits. Please enjoy your stay, and make yourself at home!

The Write Tip

I realize that pens and gel pens aren't the only writing instrument out on the market. While I prefer to write in brightly colors inks, pens aren't the best utensil for designing my D&D characters, erasing quick calculations and drawing or sketching pictures in my sketch books. In these cases, I switch to a pencil. We've all used them in grade schools when learning our letters and doing homework and passing notes to and from each other. However, when was the last time you took a good look at your pencil and thought... what exactly does this writing implement do? Why do pencils get stamped with numbers or random letters? Well, look no further as this week we take a look at pencils, both traditional and mechanical.


Getting Along: Introversion vs Extroversion

My picture name
Some people, like Mr. Cruise here, seem to lose their cool every once in a while, but, while some people may seem crazy, most of us are fairly sane most of the time, yet we're all still so different. Why do some people at the office talk all the time? Why do others seem so distant or stuck up? Some say nothing at meetings and some hog the floor. Some people are always talking about something, either at the copier machine, on the phone, or gossiping with anyone who comes along, while others ghost around the office grunting at people. Why is there is so much difference between people who come from similar backgrounds and have the same training? Why do we get along easily with certain people, but others drive us nuts, even though we can't pin down anything they're really doing wrong?

Much of what happens in an office can be explained when we look at the personality types of ourselves and our co-workers, and especially the notion of introversion vs extroversion.

Moods

Keep track of what works for you and what doesn't when it comes to your moods, or help your significant other learn how to deal with you

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

I've come to accept the fact that my boyfriend can't read my mind and that we'd both be better off if I help him learn how to deal with me. ;) I haven't actually given him a collection of these templates to help him keep track of what works and doesn't work when I'm in a particular mood, but I'm thinking about it. <grin> After all, he needs to know what to do when I'm depressed, happy, lonely, or excited.

This template is also for personal use. For example, I need to figure out what to do when I'm homesick, as I'll be spending next year away from family and friends. Keeping track of what works and what doesn't gives me ways to prevent, deal with, or recover from things like that.

How do you deal with your moods?

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Letting Go of the Goose

Zen for BeginnersA student said to the master, "I feel as though I have been raising a goose in a bottle. Now the goose is so big that I can't get it out without either breaking the bottle or harming the goose." The master said to the student, "Sir, it's out!" Hearing this, the student instantly awakened to reality.

It's time to admit something to myself that I've suspected for a long time: I'm positively bored with productivity. Not productivity, as in being productive, you must understand, but reading endlessly about productivity the topic.

Hasn't Been Your Year? The D*I*Y Guide To Faking Your Own Death

My picture name
Greetings, Steve here, wishing everyone a Happy New Year! This doesn't just seem like idle talk, as, so far in 2006, we haven't had a single hurricane, tidal wave, new wars, or new explosions of ethnic violence. Yes sir, so far, 2006 has turned out pretty well.

Neverthless, The new year is a time not only for celebration, but also for reflection. Reflection comes in many kinds. For example, there is the reflection of the person who looks like they were kicked in the head by a mule looking back at you in the mirror on New Year's Day. But there is also the kind of reflection where you think back over the past year and decide whether you should do something different, make some changes, truly dedicate yourself to being a better and more complete person. Sometimes, though, it's just been such a rotten year that you'd just like to hang it all and start all over again. To this end, we present: The D*I*Y Guide To Faking Your Own Death.

Habit Tracker

They say 21 days makes a habit. This template has great little bubbles for filling in each day you accomplish your goal. The template has 4 21-day sections per page.

Thumbnail: 
habittracker.jpg
Usage advice: 

Try one habit for each area of your life. The four sections for example, would allow you to have a goal for physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. Each day you do the desired habit you can record your accomplishment. As the 21 days progress, you will easily see your progress and balance in your life.

Paper size: 
Multiple Sizes
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Bookbinding Wrap Up

By now you've spend the past three weeks learning how to make single signature books and perhaps have tried your hand at the more intermediate book. Now that you have learned to create two different styles of books on your own, you're probably wondering where to go from here. Well, I’m here to tell you that there are 2 ways to uncover more advanced bookbinding techniques.

Your first stop should be to visit a bookstore to peruse the shelves of books on binding and crafting journals. A quick search on amazon shows over more than 30 or more books displaying instructions on building and crafting different types of books. From japanese stab bound books to crafting leather wrapped tomes. Look at the end of this article for more suggestions on good books to begin your search. However, if finding that reading instructions out of a book seems confusing to you, or you are not quite sure which of the various tomes of instruction seems right to you, I recommend bugging a friendly employee at the art store and see whether or not someone in your community is hosting a bookbinding class or seminar. More often than not, one employee or two just may know of a store in your area that caters to classes on bookbinding techniques.

Family Planner

Teach kids about mealtimes and chores or keep track of important dates with this refrigerator-door Family Planner.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

Teach young kids about time and keep track of important dates like school plays with this Family Planner. You can use the three clocks to indicate breakfast, lunch, and dinner time by shading the timespans. Use the grid at the bottom to keep track of anything: dates, chores, even checklists for kids going to school.

Lamination is optional, but can keep your planner safe from crayon marks and milk splashes. Laminate before filling in the grid, and keep a marker and rag handy.

Original template request

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Graham on Good and Bad Procrastination

From Paul Graham, author of Hackers and Painters (an enthralling read exploring the inner chambers of genius minds, connecting science, art and psychology), comes a great little article just in time for preparing your New Year's resolutions: Good and Bad Procrastination.

But the trouble with big problems can't be just that they promise no immediate reward and might cause you to waste a lot of time. If that were all, they'd be no worse than going to visit your in-laws. There's more to it than that. Big problems are terrifying. There's an almost physical pain in facing them. It's like having a vacuum cleaner hooked up to your imagination. All your initial ideas get sucked out immediately, and you don't have any more, and yet the vacuum cleaner is still sucking.

You can't look a big problem too directly in the eye. You have to approach it somewhat obliquely. But you have to adjust the angle just right: you have to be facing the big problem directly enough that you catch some of the excitement radiating from it, but not so much that it paralyzes you. You can tighten the angle once you get going, just as a sailboat can sail closer to the wind once it gets underway.

Graham is one of my favourite modern essayists, and this tight little article goes directly to the core of one of the productivity geek's most time-consuming musings. (The latter of which, of course, is ironic in itself.)