Time Management

2009 Weekly Planner 2up

Weekly planner updated for 2009. Modified version of "2008 Dated Weekly Calendar (2-up)" by "atwoodings" to meet my needs. 2 pages/week, 7 full days per week - useful for people who work weekend as well. Printed using "Booklet Printing" in Adobe Acrobat.

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Usage advice: 

*Duplex print it - auto or manual, so that page 1 is on front side of paper and page 2 is on the back side, page 3 on front and 4 on back, ....
*When done, the printed stack of paper should have the 12 months mini calendar on one side and the week "June 29, 2009 - - July 05, 2009" on the other side.
*Cut in half.
*Flip "June 29, 2009 -" stack over on top of "- July 05, 2009" stack.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Any pdf viewer that can print
Language: 
English

Weekly and monthly checklists (classic and compact)

Monthly and weekly checklists for things you do routinely. Both OOo Draw files and PDFs are here. There's probably a classic-sized form that does the same thing, but I wanted a compact (3.75" x 6.75") version with room for notes.

Thumbnail: 
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Usage advice: 

Make a list of the repeating items you want to accomplish, then check them off each day/week.

Paper size: 
Multiple Sizes
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
A PDF reader or OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English

Chaos Contained: Large Integrated Planner

See your entire week at a glance and have all your lists and plans in one place. Great for families with children, elderly care, and college students. Everything is integrated, accessible, and visible.

This planner is 8.5x11 because integration is more important to me than compactness. Additionally, my paper planner has never needed recharging and has survived being chewd on, dropped into a bowl of cake batter, and being backed over with the car. DH cannot say the same about his Palm.

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Usage advice: 

Print each tab front and back, use a three hole punch, and place in a three ring binder. Make/buy tabs to stick on the sides of pages or use tab dividers to separate sections. I have other sections for food recipes, craft recipes/instructions, current projects, etc. Use sheet protecters if you need extra spill/slobber/etc. protection.

Features:
*Weekly page contains current month and upcoming month calendar.

*Daily areas to track differing schedules for spouses, children, elderly care , pets, or various subjects--i.e. reading assignments, labs, etc.

*Daily area for lunch and dinner planning, or use this area to track medications, diets, work, etc.

*Area to plan evening activities, or any daily activities or daily needs.

*Monthly page for special days and weekly to do lists, notes page

*Areas on weekly page for shopping lists, daily to do tracker, notes, and special projects

*Notes pages to print out

*Household tab has a basic cleaning list, quick reference daily routine, reference for repeating schedules, and quick phone number reference

*Good Behavior chart tracks behavior, chores, or other desired outcomes with grids sized for star stickers.

*Reference sheet tracks the calendar year through 2016

You may use or freely distribute this template; do not sell it in any digital or printed format.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Microsoft Excel
Language: 
english

5x8 weekly planner landscape view

Is this anything like you want? I don't really know much either, but is this rough draft what you want?

Usage advice: 

I print on a regular sheet with 5.5x8.5 margins and then trace around it and it comes out okay.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
open office
Language: 
English

Daily Schedule Planner

One of the tools I've used to manage my time is the Daily Planning Worksheet from PowerSystems, but it takes up too much space and has a lot of pieces I really don't use.

The part I do use, and am most productive when I use it faithfully, is the schedule for the day.

I reference my work calendar and my personal calendar - both online - to see what I need to do that day, as well as my "To Do" list and pencil them into the schedule.

This may sound like extra work for some of you, but for me, the act of writing it down truly makes me aware of it in ways I'm not if I just rely on looking at my calendar on the computer screen and mentally planning out my day.

I took the schedule concept and added my favorite concept from Leo Baubuta's "Zen to Done" philosophy - the Most Important Tasks.

For me, this is where it gets really cool. Since I have been trying to have a paginated work journal (ala Dave Terry's Analog Work Journal) I wanted to integrate this into the pages, rather than having a whole separate page. I was able to fit 4 days on one letter-sized page then printed them on full-page labels and cut the sheet into quarters.

Now, it doesn't matter how voluminous (or not) my notes were from yesterday as I just slap the label on the next open space in my work journal. The numbering stays consistent - and if there's a day I don't need one (i.e. I'm at a conference or in training all day) I can spare the space in my journal.

I know there are a lot of folks who have worked to integrate their personal and work lives into planners, but I find I need to do just the opposite as I have too much integration as a telecommuter.

I hope you enjoy it. I tried to keep true to DIY format, while adding a bit of color for my own enjoyment.

t.

Thumbnail: 
Work Day Plan Sample.JPG
Usage advice: 

I used Avery white 5½ x 8½ shipping labels (Avery product #8126), but a full-sheet label would work just as well.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Open Office Draw
Language: 
English

I Dood It (for Shris)

Here's a pair of quick-and-dirty "I Did" list templates for Shris based on the discussion over here: http://www.diyplanner.com/node/6151

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Usage advice: 

Refer to this thread: http://www.diyplanner.com/node/6151

It is an editable template, so if you want to modify it, go for it.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Open Office
Language: 
N/A

4.25 x 6.75 Covey Compact Size calendar

4.25 x 6.75 Covey Compact size
Month at top of page with weekdays at bottom.
Can change and edit in Open Office. My first one.
I don't know how to do a thumnail so .pdf is included for quick look.

Usage advice: 

I know it is a waste of paper, but my knowledge doesn't extend to 2-up. I print using a letter size piece of paper and then lay a Covey compact sheet on top at left-top position, draw around two sides and cut out and punch.

Paper size: 
Other
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Open Office
Language: 
English

Project Meeting Notes Template

A template to track notes from project meetings using the D*I*Y Planner OpenOffice Widget Kit.

Thumbnail: 
ProjectMeetingTemplate-20081002091610.png
Usage advice: 

Use this form to track meetings, attendees, topics to discuss, and notes from topics. The form tracks meeting topics and project assignment. Conference rooms, conference call telephone numbers, and conference call meeting ID numbers can be entered as well.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Adobe Acrobat Reader or OpenOffice Draw
Language: 
English - US

What's your personal kit?

RenArt Moleskine+3x5In my post about my workplace gear, I noted that there had been a certain divergence between the gear I use in the office and the gear I use for my own personal and creative time. Essentially, the office gear is quite polished and uses a Circa system as a base, complete with fancy zip folio and plenty of DIYP forms, while my personal gear is far more... raw.

I've always maintained that structure is important when you have a lot to take on and keep organized, and having a well-built planner (whether digital or analogue) is key to that. But --although my home life does require some degree of organisation-- it's far less than the myriad projects I have to manage for work. In fact, some simple to-do lists and a calendar is about all I need, along with the occasional contact look-up. Thus, part of my kit is a few DiyP HipsterPDA Action cards and a month-view calendar. I copy down pertinent appointments and to-do items so that I can ferry them and sync with my other planner and online tools as needed.

A far bigger concern for me is creativity. Now, creativity comes in many forms, and that's one of the reasons why I created the DiyP Creative Pack, which is a separate pack in Classic and integrated into the HipsterPDA size pack. Having those prompts can help you manage plots, devise (and remember) characters, keep tabs on story props (like that elusive Holy Grail you keep losing), shuffle your storyboards (did Han shoot before or after?), and otherwise structure your ideas. So, part two of my kit: a selection of DiyP creative cards, which may vary according to the project I'm concentrating on.