Time Management

Meeting Page

This is part of a page from my new system that i use for taking notes in meetings. I use it in team and staff meetings + meetings with my boss and other individuals.

Thumbnail: 
meeting agenda thumbnail.jpg
Usage advice: 

Components & Usage...

Header
Room to write description of the meeting, i usally write the date as well. Can be used for team meetings or meetings with individuals. Also a box with processed - after a meeting i transfer notes and actions to my diary and planner system and then file this sheet.

Prep
This is where i empty my head of all agenda items that i want to speak about at the meeting. I have a formal meeting with my boss every monday morning, so during the rest of the week i keep one page handy and jot down anything i need to speak to him about at this meeting.

Notes
A fairly big notes section for joting down stuff that comes up at the meeting or just doodling if it's a really boring meeting!

Action Section
A place to write all the actions that have come out of the meeting.

I find this works really well for personal note taking and minute taking at meetings. Let me know if it works for you or any improvements and stay tuned for more pages in this system.

There are two identical pages in the pdf so you can print double sided.

Paper size: 
A4
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
adobe reader, preview, etc
Language: 
English

A5 Undated Panda Day

This is my A5 undated panda day planner page.
it helps me to keep organised with my daily tasks

Thumbnail: 
panda day.jpg
Usage advice: 

This is in JPEG format, you can print it as single sided or double sided.
i myself print as a single side as i use the back for my daily notes.

Paper size: 
A5
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
microsoft publisher
Language: 
english

Implementing the Middle Way Method

my planner systemWow, a new year, a new planning method, and a new planner. We're all set, or are we? As you recall from the introductory article, I created the Middle Way Method to help take advantage of the best aspects of top down, and bottom up planning. Soon after creating the methodology, I realized that in order to put this practice to work, I'd need to hack together a new planner, which I've called the Middle Way notebook. I showed you how to create one of your own last month.

Now I'd like to take some time and look at how the method, system, and journal all work together to create planning nirvana. In this article, I'll guide you through the process of working with the Middle Way Method System and corresponding planner. We'll use the methodology's step by step planning process to guide you through real-life examples (from my life) of how I use the forms and method. The whole weekly planning process usually takes me 15 to 30 minutes, unless I choose to journal for a longer amount of time. To help you understand this process, I'll be using examples from my personal life.

2010 Weekly Team Task Planner - 2 Slot

A way to track weekly tasks for people who manage a team.

Thumbnail: 
Weekly Team Task Planner - 2 Up.png
Usage advice: 

Don't remember where I got the template for this. Was either on this site, or David Seah's Personal CEO (http://www.davidseah.com).

Modified it to my liking, then I lost the hard drive I put them on. Recently found the printed copies, and did them from scratch in OpenOffice Draw. Once I got started, it was easy.

The first one is for 2010. You can circle the month, and write in the topic in the blank by the year. I manage a team and needed to track follow-ups for communication to my boss. You can put the person you're assigning the task to in the "[WHO]" spot, and when they were assigned the task/item, and what they're waiting for.

I also created a "6 Slot" version where I can track my team's items.

Hope you like it - feel free to use to your liking. (Also, please let me know if I didn't credit the people who should be).

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Adobe Acrobat
Language: 
English

2010 Weekly Team Task Planner - 6 Slot

A way to track weekly tasks for people who manage a team.

Thumbnail: 
Weekly Team Task Planner - 6 Up.png
Usage advice: 

Don't remember where I got the template for this. Was either on this site, or David Seah's Personal CEO (http://www.davidseah.com).

Modified it to my liking, then I lost the hard drive I put them on. Recently found the printed copies, and did them from scratch in OpenOffice Draw. Once I got started, it was easy.

The first one is for 2010. You can circle the month, and write in the topic in the blank by the year. I manage a team and needed to track follow-ups for who I manage. You can put the person you're assigning the task to in the "[WHO]" spot, and when they were assigned the task/item, and what they're waiting for.

I also created a "2 Slot" version where I can track my own (and my boss') items.

Hope you like it - feel free to use to your liking. (Also, please let me know if I didn't credit the people who should be).

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Adobe Acrobat
Language: 
English

Weekly Calendar 2up dynamic

I've written a small program to create a Weekly 2up calendar.

Should work for all paper sizes.

Thumbnail: 
WeeklyCalendar.png
Usage advice: 

Just select start and end dates (the program always uses the whole week), set the papersize and margins to your needs and print it out.

[ADMIN NOTE]: This software is DonationWare

Paper size: 
Other
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
.Net 2.0
Language: 
English

Building a Custom Middle Way Planner

Editor's Note: Hey gang, sorry this article is late in posting, it has been done for awhile but since it features a huge nine-book signature upload, we've been having a hard time locating server space to host the files. We're putting the files on Jordan's site for now; so go easy on his web server. Thanks for your patience!


My Complete SystemLast month, I introduced you to the The Middle Way Method, which is a productivity system I made up that works for me. Today I'm going to show you the kit that I made for use with that system. One of the reasons I created this system was because I wanted to ditch the binder. I've been wanting to create my own books for a while now, and this gave me the perfect opportunity to show off my creative skills. I'm currently using the first book I made as a journal; and my second, third, and fourth books become the basis of my planner.

As you can see from the first photograph, my kit has three parts: a 9-signature planning book, and two single signature sub-notebooks: a Weekly Diabetes Tracker (containing 6 weeks of data) and an address book. I also keep a stash of index cards inside the kit, when I need them.

Before you set about to create your own kit, I suggest you read the following articles:

2010 Calendars

I've borrowed from some existing templates to create two daily planners - one for intensive 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. appointment scheduling combined with those daily tasks, lists, workouts, intake monitors, etc. and another for a less appointment, more activity-based schedule. The second still has room for a few appointments as well as directions to those appointments, but includes more intensive to do and to buy lists. All of this can be tweaked to fit your needs using the Ctrl+F method of replacing a word or phrase with one more appropriate to your lifestyle. It works well in letter or A4. Each file contains the whole month of January, but a Ctrl+F can replace the month and the dates and days can be changed quickly manually. The No Weekly planner is my favorite and shows my progress with mirroring pages to allow more room on the page and room for the hole puncher to not cut into text.

Usage advice: 

I use the one with hourly scheduling for days when I'm buried in appointments and want to make sure I still get to the dry cleaner's and pick up those groceries without neglecting my workout. The other is great for ordinary usage, making it to the gym and a doctor's appointment on an errand-filled day, etc.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
Microsoft Word
Language: 
English

Basic Work Week: 2010

I work an 8-5 job, 5 days a week. Work related appointments / tasks / reminders are handled electronically in Outlook. However, I still like to have a basic overview of the working week down on paper. I originally started using chefz' Version of the Planner Pad: http://www.diyplanner.com/node/6597

That was still too detailed for me, so I have come up with my own Planner. I am sharing it in case anyone else is interested. I have attached the Excel file as well for those who want to edit it. The PDF covers the whole of 2010.

Thumbnail: 
work week.JPG
Usage advice: 

I print out the PDF in booklet format on A4 paper.

Paper size: 
A5
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Acrobat Reader; MS Excel
Language: 
English