Analog / Digital

A Renaissance Art Case Hack

As many of you have noticed from the chatter in our forums, Arthur and the crew at Renaissance Art have been busy. Last week they introduced a few new products to their line. A few of these products included introducing a whole new series of cases for the Moleskine Reporter notebook. These cases give landscape journal lovers the ability to indulge in Renaissance Art's line-up of quality, hand made and rugged looking cases. Arthur was kind enough to send me a prototype of one of the new cases. When I received it, I was impressed with the quality and the changes that were made. And then, the hack idea came to me...

In order to make this hack work, you'll need to get a Moleskine Reporter Cover Book Style (with either the side pocket or the 3x5 card holder) and a Circa PDA. The Circa PDA, just so happens to be big enough for you to slip your Circa PDA into the right side and still have enough room for cards on the left. It closes without a hitch. You can order one with a pen loop which gives you more flexibility in carrying your note-taking system around with you.

This hack was tested with the Reporter Cover Book Style that comes with a side pocket and iScribe's Circa PDA. My first thought was that a leather covered Circa PDA was going to be too big for the notebook, but as you can see in the images, it'll work just fine. Thanks goes to iScribe for testing out my hack and taking the picture for today's post.

Classic Size 2 Page Per Day

This may look familiar to some folks carrying planners, I would like to see it as a kit!!

Thumbnail: 
classic 2 page_thumb.bmp
Usage advice: 

Two Page per Day Planner Pages

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
OpenOffice.org Draw
Language: 
English

Real Life Experiments: Going from Digital to Analogue (Part 1)

This is a guest article by Alastair, faithful D*I*Y Planner reader. Al is technology/gadget obsessed nut with more PDA's, keyboards, mice, PC's etc than would normally be considered sane. He is obsessed with books, writing, organisational tools and has an ingrained belief that some things will always be better done the "old fashioned" way because it's still the best way to do them. He also has an iPod loaded with music from Mozart to Motorhead and he has a wonderful, tolerant girlfriend he doesn't deserve; and two cats that politely humour him.


This is my story. Of how I came to use digital gadgets and then how I got myself out of using them. As far back as I can remember I've always kept a diary. At first, it was all paper based. Then one day, I saw my first Palm Pilot and decided that I couldn't live without one. This simple moment started my quest to discover the perfect electronic planning solution. Of course, in the beginning I didn't own a computer, so that complicated my use of the Palm. That and the fact that I decided I could live perfectly well without the new toy. So into “the drawer” it went and I didn't think anything more about it and returned to my trusty diary and notebook. Peace was restored in the form of a brown leather, personal Filofax.

In 2003, Dell released the Axim X5 Pocket PC and again, the gadget bug bit me. Except this time it worked and just did exactly what I asked it to do. A year or so later, its big brother, the X50v, arrived (which I think is still the best Pocket PC ever made). Once again the gadget bug bit me and I started using this new device to capture my thoughts and appointments. Eventually, I graduated to the X51v but I was never as happy as I had been with the X50v. Being dissatisfied with the new system, I started looking for alternatives. During a brief meeting with an IT consultant, I discovered the Palm Treo 650.

Hooked on this new device, I made the move to an integrated device about a year and a half ago. My current system is MS Outlook based and I use it both at home and at work and all my data gets synchronized with my Treo. It works and does not cause me any real headaches. Whilst it’s been an interesting year and a half somehow my Treo is just not enough; and this is where the story of my returning to an analog lifestyle really begins.

Fillable Checklist

Following the great work by DucatiChic, I've converted the Classic size Checklist into a fillable form via Adobe Reader or Preview (Mac). I used the Checklist on page 69 of the D*I*Y Planner 3.0 (Classic Edition) Core Package.

Usage advice: 

Type your information in and print. If you are going to save any data in the document, save your changes in a new document.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Adobe Reader, Preview, and PDF reading application
Language: 
English

PDF of 2-Page Per Year Dynamic

Since some folks have had issues with generating pdf's or printing with ygor's wonderful dynamic templates, this 2008-2009, 2 Page Per Year overview was created by Jon Glass.

Enjoy!

Jason

Usage advice: 

As you wish...

Paper size: 
Index Card (3 x 5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Viewer
Language: 
English

A5 2008 Calendar (Working Week)

Simple working week (Monday to Friday) calendar for 2008

Thumbnail: 
Thumbnail - A5 Calendar.jpg
Usage advice: 

Created to allow for double-sided printing.

I needed a 2008 calendar and decided to use the new Apple Pages application to create a suitable template - along with others for my A5 Filofax.

So - please have fun if you want to use it.

Paper size: 
A5
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Adobe Viewer
Language: 
English

Categorized shopping list

This is a small template for a shopping list which can be printed on 3x4 size paper (with space on the top for punching holes), with headings for different categories of items, like produce, dairy, etc. It currently fits my closest store layout, but I am including the source file (requires OpenOffice Draw), so that it can be tailored.

As a side benefit, this template encourages eating more veggies ;)

Thumbnail: 
Shopping.png
Usage advice: 

This template was designed for the Myndology Bare Memo (3x4), however, the source file is included.

Paper size: 
Index Card (3 x 5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
OpenOffice
Language: 
English

Note Taking: University Style

This article is written by paulien. She studied mathematics and classical languages and just finished two master degrees. She lives in the Netherlands and just started working on her PhD in applied mathematics. You can visit her Wordpress blog where she occasionally writes posts (he'll update it soon!). She just love books, notebooks pens and the like. And we're happy to have her here and writing.


When you first go to university, you are suddenly expected to do much more work than in school, and with much less help and guidance than you are used to. After all, you are an adult now, and you should be capable of managing your own affairs. Sadly, no one has ever told you how to do that. How do you plan for writing papers, giving presentations and studying for exams. And how can you manage to get good grades without too much stress and still have time for a job and a social life? I want to share some things I learned, and which I would have loved to hear at my first day of lectures.

First I will name some of the tools and supplies I used a lot. Then I will take a look at different aspects of the student life. I don't mention computer and printer, as every university has those for use.

Converting the DIY Planner hPDA Cards to fit a Franklin Covey Compact Size Planner

FC Compact DIYPlanner P1030657

D*I*Y Planner forms come in all sizes. However, one size we've needed has been the 6-hole compact size. These instructions and screenshots help you take the hPDA cards and resize them to fit the Franklin Covey Compact 6-hole planner. There are two "industry standard" sizes for the 6-hole planners: 3.75"x6.75" (Day Timer/Day Runner) and 4.25"x6.75" (Franklin Covey). And of course, many other companies out ther producing planners in roughly this size but the holes don't always match. I will build a version for the smaller 6-hole size page later on.

This process works best in Photoshop where you have the best control of image/canvas size. I wouldn't recommend trying it using Adobe Acrobat. (However I have heard that Acrobat 7 seems to have better features.) I do not know if this procedure works with other photo editing programs such as PaintShop Pro, Gimp or PrintMaster Gold. If you own those packages and are able to follow my instructions... feel free to test them out and let me know.