Misc.

hPDA Expanding File

Make your own expanding file (like the popular Moleskine version) with as many pockets as you want.

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Usage advice: 

This template is for a single expanding pocket. It's a little wider (0.5" wider, actually) than a standard 3x5 index card, and 2.75" high so the cards can be visible over the top edge. The pockets can be glued together to make a multi-pocket expanding file, similar to the Moleskine version. The only reason I made this is because I was too lazy to drive to the store and buy a Moleskine.

Another great modification/addition to this template would be gluing a flap-style cover over the top, so the cards aren't falling all over the place.

A few notes:

  • I used permanent double-sided tape to attach the tabs AND to attach the pockets together, and it works very well. It holds better than glue does right away, so I recommend it.
  • The corner fold (the only angled lines in the template) are a real pain in the neck, but don't lose hope, because it CAN be done. If Smead can do it, so can you. I find that it helps to fold the wide sides of the pocket up, and then mash the corner fold in there BEFORE cutting any tabs out.
  • I used cover-weight (65-lb.) cardstock for this, and since I was gluing more than one pocket together, it provided the right flexibility but was still sturdy enough when done. Anything thicker might be too hard to fold properly.
  • Last tip: scoring the creases (with the dull side of a butterknife, or a letter opener) helps the paper crease neatly. Use a ruler to guide the butterknife along the straight lines.

Also, there are two templates: one requires a printer capable of borderless letter-size printing, and has 2.75"-high sides all the way around. The other template can print on any printer that can handle half-inch margins, but the "expanding" sides of the pocket are only 2.25" high.

Paper size: 
Index Card (3 x 5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Pocket Page - Classic

A template for making a 'pocket' page. Can be used as a GTD Inbox pocket for Classic-size planners.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

1. Print template on 8.5”x11”card stock.
2. Cut along heavy lines.
3. Fold along dashed lines following the arrowheads’ directions.

Note: These instructions are also printed with the template.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Business Card Case - Origami Style

Create your own six-pocket case using one letter or A4 sized piece of paper. Holds up to 24 business cards or about 6 credit cards.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

The attachment includes step-by-step instructions with photographs so you can fold your own business card case from a single piece of paper.

I used a piece of paper that had a printed pattern on one side and plain white on the other. However, both sides will show in the final product, so you may want to find paper that has color/pattern on both sides.

The folds are simple and there is no cutting. The result is a small paper rectangle with six pockets--four flap pockets and two full-depth pockets. The pockets hold everything reasonably securely, but if you're nervous about it you can be extra sure with a binder clip, rubber band, or some other extra device if you wish. This is not a 'jotter,' it's just a set of pockets.

You can stuff more than 4 business cards into each pocket, but if you do that in all the pockets it gets pretty tight. About 4 cards in each of the 6 pockets is still reasonably convenient and easy to put in/take out, etc.

If you have a small clip pen, you could attach the pen along the 'spine' of the case when you're done folding, if you wish.

Paper size: 
Other
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Fountain Pens: A Place to Start

[I've been looking for someone to write about fountain pens for a while, and I was pleased to see Danny Vinson slinging together some words on this very topic. Apparently, his lack of penmanship is offset by his appreciation for a fine writing utensil. Danny lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, so I can only assume his more emotional moments are spent by polishing his Esterbrooks to the tune of John Denver tunes. --DJ]

For years I wanted to write with a fountain pen. It always seemed to me like a more elegant way to get words onto paper, but I frankly didn't know where to start. Every time I checked out a pen shop, seeing prices in the hundreds of dollars (or more) kept me from doing much experimenting. I didn't think that the 'cheap' pens would be worth the money they cost, or write very well. So I played with dip-pens, the kind where you dip a steel nib into an ink bottle, write on paper until the line begins to thin, dip it in the ink again, and so forth. Fun, high potential for ink-stained fingers, though a little scratchy on the paper.

Esterbrook JThen I found my grandfather's 60-year-old Esterbrook fountain pen a year ago, and my perspective on writing longhand changed. When I went to get it checked out and cleaned at Watch & Pen in Richmond, since it had been pretty well gummed-up by an unnamed 10-year-old quite a few years ago (ahem), they were having a sale. So, a few days later when I picked up the Esterbrook, I had a nice shiny Libelle fountain pen to go along with it. Why the Libelle? The shop guy recommended it as a good pen for the money, the price certainly seemed reasonable compared to the other pens they had, and it felt good when I tried it out - much smoother than I expected.


Hipster Portrait Forms

A few forms for the hipster, in Portrait orientation. Includes a Schedule, Task Plan, What/Where/When, and an untitled ruled card with a grey column on the right.

Usage advice: 

These are a few forms I've been fiddling with. They're for 3x5 cards, but they'll scale to 4x6 just fine.

Line spacing is .20 inch, wider than the standard DIY hipster forms.

I use the schedule and task plan back-to-back. One of these per day shows me what meetings and appointments I have as well as my intended (but unscheduled) actions for the day. There's a spot for a time estimate on the Task Plan, so you can calculate just how many things to put on the plan based on how much time you have available.

The What/Where/When card is my new favorite. It's incredibly versatile because the title bar includes a prompt for what it is, where it is, and when it is. The rest of the card is checklist-style. So this card could be your meeting agenda/notes, a shopping list, brainstorming for a project, or a bundle of notes from a conversation. The last slide, the one with no title, goes on the back of the what/where/when card for overflow. I only use the back for meeting notes, generally, so there's no boxes on the ruled slide.

The PDF is in the zip, as is the Draw file. So you can just print or you can tweak the forms.

Paper size: 
Index Card (3 x 5)
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview), OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English

Hipster Landscape Forms

Landscape forms for hipsters. Includes two different schedules, Task Plan, Do It, Buy It, Be There, Note to Self, Voicemail, 3 different Project forms, and a Project Actions form.

Usage advice: 

This is a small collection of forms I was twiddling with. They're one-up 3x5 format, but they'd scale to 4x6 no problem.

Line spacing is .20 inch, slightly larger than the DIY standard hipster forms. This is landscape orientation so you have fewer items with more description.

Thought you might find them interesting. The Draw file is included so you can fiddle with them if you want. PDF is in there if you just want to print.

Paper size: 
Index Card (3 x 5)
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview), OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English

Textbook Hire Record

A basic table which is great for recording the textbooks that you have hired for school/college/uni whatever. Available in Letter, Classic, A4 and A5.

Usage advice: 

Use this to record the textbooks that you get out for school. It has date, title, staff (to sign that it is returned) and barcode (so you know which one is yours), with another column (in the second version that appears here) for which subject the book is for.

I recommend filling it out, so if you lose your textbooks, you know what the barcode is and if you have returned it and things like that.
To print:
- Letter and A4 planner users just print as usual.
- Classic and A5 planner users go File -> Print Setup and change the paper size to what you use. It should work.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Business Card Cases - Crayon Box Style

Two boxes for holding business cards or credit cards. One holds about 30 business cards, the other holds about 60 business cards. These boxes require a bit of glue to hold them together.

Usage advice: 

These boxes are good for purse organization as well as mini-hipsters. They hold credit cards or business cards as well as business-card-size-hipsters. Use different colored boxes to differentiate different types of cards--medical, membership, punch cards...

Print them both on heavy cardstock--I used 110lb Card Stock, not the lighter weight Cover Stock. Do them both just in case you decide you want a bigger or smaller box once you've finished folding one.

Cut out the whole thing around the outside edges. There are four little spots to make additional slits, these are marked with arrows and instructions on the template pages.

Score the creases with the dull rounded edge of a butter knife. Use a ruler to guide the blade in a straight line. This will make the folding easier and cleaner later on. Trust me, you want to do this step.

Glue the long trapezoidal tab to the inside of the fat rectangular tab on the opposite end. This will form a tube. I used glue stick for this. Double-sided tape would probably work also.

Fold in the little side tabs on one end of the box and tuck in the rounded tab. Then put your business cards into the box and close the other end the same way.

If you want greater security than just tabs and slots, you can use binder clips on either end of the box to make double sure it stays closed. Ribbons and rubber bands will also work just fine.

Some options:
* You could maybe punch a small hole in one corner of the box to add a ring to it so you could attach it to a keychain. Not sure how this would work long term, but you could try it.
* You could add a pen loop on the side of the box by adding a two inch by one inch rectangle to the box template and forming it into a loop with glue.
* You could cut some small diagonal slits in the four corners on one side of the box to make a 'jotter' arrangement for a card on the outside of the box. Just don't get them too close to the edges. :)
* You could add a 'hang tag' to one short end of the box by adding a one inch wide tab along the edge of the fat rectangle, folding it in half (glue it down), and hole-punching it. This would probably work better than hole-punching through the body of the box.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview), OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English

Envelope-style Business Card Cases

Two templates for business card cases. One holds about 30 cards, the other about 60 cards. No glue needed.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

Print both pages on heavy cardstock. I use 110 lb cardstock, not the lighter weight cover stock. You only need one page, but you might decide after folding one that you need a bigger or smaller one, so you might as well do them both at once.

Cut around the edges of the diagram to make a plus shape. Decide whether you want a tab-and-slot closure or some other closure (see also the envelope-style hipster cases for more details).

Use the rounded, dull side of a butter knife to score the horizontal and vertical lines. This will help you fold the creases more cleanly later. Use a metal-edged or other strong ruler to help you guide the butter knife in a straight line.

Fold all of the creases you just scored. Fold them all the same direction, so the flaps all point up when you're done.

Put your cards in the center of the plus. Fold the side, small tabs in over your stack, then the bottom (non-pointy) tab up. Finally, fold the top (pointy) tab down and tuck it in the slot if you chose to do the tab-and-slot closure.

Note: Once you've got the hang of this template, you can transfer the design to a more decorative piece of cardstock--the kind that won't go through your laser or inkjet printer. The thumbnail shows a box made from cardstock that won't go through a printer. Thick and textured cardstocks will work with this box, though textured, ribbed, or lumpy ones will be less suitable as writing surfaces.

shris

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview), OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English