Workshop

Business Card Case - Origami Style

Create your own six-pocket case using one letter or A4 sized piece of paper. Holds up to 24 business cards or about 6 credit cards.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

The attachment includes step-by-step instructions with photographs so you can fold your own business card case from a single piece of paper.

I used a piece of paper that had a printed pattern on one side and plain white on the other. However, both sides will show in the final product, so you may want to find paper that has color/pattern on both sides.

The folds are simple and there is no cutting. The result is a small paper rectangle with six pockets--four flap pockets and two full-depth pockets. The pockets hold everything reasonably securely, but if you're nervous about it you can be extra sure with a binder clip, rubber band, or some other extra device if you wish. This is not a 'jotter,' it's just a set of pockets.

You can stuff more than 4 business cards into each pocket, but if you do that in all the pockets it gets pretty tight. About 4 cards in each of the 6 pockets is still reasonably convenient and easy to put in/take out, etc.

If you have a small clip pen, you could attach the pen along the 'spine' of the case when you're done folding, if you wish.

Paper size: 
Other
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview)
Language: 
English

Origami Mini Jotter

Sarah B. has been one of our most prolific site contributors lately, by way of her helpful advice and folding templates, and has impressed me time and again with her thoroughness and unique perspective. I guess I shouldn't have been surprised by her article submission, the ultimate in combining paper craft with planning. - DJ]

And now for the post that you've all been waiting for, Origami Mini Jotter or How to make your very own Mini Jotter out of a regular old piece of paper! It's fun, it's easy, and it's even useful.

Here's what you'll need:
  • Flat surface
  • One piece of standard weight letter sized or A4 paper
  • Folding tool - something to press the creases
  • Ruler or straight edge
  • Slicing tool
  • Double sided tape (optional)

Business Card Cases - Crayon Box Style

Two boxes for holding business cards or credit cards. One holds about 30 business cards, the other holds about 60 business cards. These boxes require a bit of glue to hold them together.

Usage advice: 

These boxes are good for purse organization as well as mini-hipsters. They hold credit cards or business cards as well as business-card-size-hipsters. Use different colored boxes to differentiate different types of cards--medical, membership, punch cards...

Print them both on heavy cardstock--I used 110lb Card Stock, not the lighter weight Cover Stock. Do them both just in case you decide you want a bigger or smaller box once you've finished folding one.

Cut out the whole thing around the outside edges. There are four little spots to make additional slits, these are marked with arrows and instructions on the template pages.

Score the creases with the dull rounded edge of a butter knife. Use a ruler to guide the blade in a straight line. This will make the folding easier and cleaner later on. Trust me, you want to do this step.

Glue the long trapezoidal tab to the inside of the fat rectangular tab on the opposite end. This will form a tube. I used glue stick for this. Double-sided tape would probably work also.

Fold in the little side tabs on one end of the box and tuck in the rounded tab. Then put your business cards into the box and close the other end the same way.

If you want greater security than just tabs and slots, you can use binder clips on either end of the box to make double sure it stays closed. Ribbons and rubber bands will also work just fine.

Some options:
* You could maybe punch a small hole in one corner of the box to add a ring to it so you could attach it to a keychain. Not sure how this would work long term, but you could try it.
* You could add a pen loop on the side of the box by adding a two inch by one inch rectangle to the box template and forming it into a loop with glue.
* You could cut some small diagonal slits in the four corners on one side of the box to make a 'jotter' arrangement for a card on the outside of the box. Just don't get them too close to the edges. :)
* You could add a 'hang tag' to one short end of the box by adding a one inch wide tab along the edge of the fat rectangle, folding it in half (glue it down), and hole-punching it. This would probably work better than hole-punching through the body of the box.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview), OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English

Envelope-style Business Card Cases

Two templates for business card cases. One holds about 30 cards, the other about 60 cards. No glue needed.

Thumbnail: 
Usage advice: 

Print both pages on heavy cardstock. I use 110 lb cardstock, not the lighter weight cover stock. You only need one page, but you might decide after folding one that you need a bigger or smaller one, so you might as well do them both at once.

Cut around the edges of the diagram to make a plus shape. Decide whether you want a tab-and-slot closure or some other closure (see also the envelope-style hipster cases for more details).

Use the rounded, dull side of a butter knife to score the horizontal and vertical lines. This will help you fold the creases more cleanly later. Use a metal-edged or other strong ruler to help you guide the butter knife in a straight line.

Fold all of the creases you just scored. Fold them all the same direction, so the flaps all point up when you're done.

Put your cards in the center of the plus. Fold the side, small tabs in over your stack, then the bottom (non-pointy) tab up. Finally, fold the top (pointy) tab down and tuck it in the slot if you chose to do the tab-and-slot closure.

Note: Once you've got the hang of this template, you can transfer the design to a more decorative piece of cardstock--the kind that won't go through your laser or inkjet printer. The thumbnail shows a box made from cardstock that won't go through a printer. Thick and textured cardstocks will work with this box, though textured, ribbed, or lumpy ones will be less suitable as writing surfaces.

shris

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview), OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English

Template for Envelope-Style hPDA Case

hPDA Envelope CaseIn case you folks haven't seen it, cast your peepers on a handy little template for creating a HipsterPDA case for either 30 or 60 cards.

Great contribution, shris! This is a prime example of why we're so very proud of our little community.

Envelope-style Hipster Cases

Two envelope-style cardstock cases for hipster PDAs (index card stacks). One fits about 30 cards, the other about double that. No gluing required.

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Usage advice: 

Print out both pages on heavy cardstock (I used 110lb Card Stock, not the lighter-weight Cover Stock). I say print both just because you might decide you want a bigger or smaller box after you see how it folds up, so you might as well do them both. But the template is only one letter-size sheet. I would expect that A4 would work, just don't resize the image before printing. Trimming the image would be fine.

Cut around the edges of the image with a scissors. This will make a plus-shaped piece of cardstock.

Decide how you want your box to be closed. You have several options:
* Tab-and-slot. This is the default. It won't close very tightly, but it won't pop open spontaneously I don't think. If you want this, cut the diagonal lines on the top flap to make the flap come to a broad point. Then slice the slot on the bottom flap with an X-acto knife (or other sharp blade).
* Velcro dot. You can cut along the diagonals or not as you wish, but don't cut the slot. Stick the dot to the top flap first, then use that to place the dot on the bottom flap. The self-adhesive dots are pretty easy to work with.
* Ribbon-tie. You can cut small slots for the ribbon to pass through or not as you please. Cut the point in the top flap or not as you please.
* Rubber band. Don't cut the slot. Cut the point if you want. Just wrap a rubber band around it all to keep it closed.
* Binder clip. The larger box requires a 1.25" clip. The smaller one will take a 3/4" clip. I recommend NOT cutting the top flap to a point, simply because the rectangular flap will give you more places to put the clip.

Finish your cutting based on your decision (above).

Use the blunt rounded side of a butter knife (not the side with the teeth) to score along the remaining lines. Just press down so you can see that the fibers have been squished by the knife. This will help you fold more easily. You can skip this if you want, but your folds will be much cleaner if you score the lines. Use a ruler with a metal edge to guide the knife in a straight line.

Fold all of the horizontal and vertical lines. Fold them all in the same way, so all the flaps stand up when you're finished. I folded mine so the printing would be inside the finished box, but you could do the opposite if you want the lines to show on the outside of the box.

Put your stack of cards inside the box. Fold the short flaps in, then the long flaps. Close the box using your preferred method.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Public Domain
Applications required: 
PDF Reader (Adobe Reader, Mac OS X Preview) or OpenOffice.org
Language: 
English

Modding the D*I*Y Planner: Text Changes and Translations

Lately, I've been going back and re-reading many of the site comments in preparation for the Widget Kit specifications. As you probably know (if you've been around here a while), the D*I*Y Planner project has been created in the spirit of true "do-it-yourself-ness," and it occurs to me that many of the requests I see are easily accomplished by almost anybody with access to the right software. In other words, you don't need to be an OpenOffice.org guru, or a graphic designer, to handle many of the smaller things that people ask for on a regular basis. I've decided to start a small (and infrequent) series on "modding" the D*I*Y Planner templates for the most common purposes. Today, I'm going to cover textual changes, such as those required for producing translations and changing page headers.

Something Up My Sleeve

innowen's giving up her Thursday slot to give John Norris the spotlight. Once again, he's back with more envelope pushing D*I*Y Planner goodness.


This time it's a planner for your wrist.
Really.

OK, all those who write on their hands, raise them up!

Don't be shy...

What? Too cheap for a wrist PDA? Think D*I*Y Planner technology for your hand is a joke or worse?(sfw)

Well, suffer no more! Read on to find out more about this wonderful device and where you can get it.

Make Your Statement

Many of us meander through life wondering if we can do more, be more and what we can do to leave our mark. We question our place in this hectic world of corporations and consumerism. We seek ways to refine and redefine our true selves. I know I do. I go through phases where I wonder if the path I live makes me happy. If the company I work for helps me to become the person I want to be tomorrow. If the answers of who I am and whether my creative projects align with the mark I desire to leave upon this world. My personal "I was HERE" stamp. My life consists deeply of weaving my career, home and spiritual path into a cohesive whole. Creating a personal mission statement can help ensure who you are and what you do continues to blend harmoniously together.

Personal mission statements reflect an individual's sense of purpose and meaning in life. It defines who you are, what you want to focus on, and how you can mold yourself over time. It's a tool that can help focus your energy, actions and decisions towards the things you think are most important. Your mission statement should touch upon what you want to focus on and who you want to become as a person in this part of your life. It can become a road map to achieving your goals and dreams.