DIYPlanner.com

Daily Planner (Colorful)- Modified

I had earlier posted a daily scheduler which was a bit whimsical and suited my taste at that point of time. However, increasingly, I have felt the need to have the same content in a slightly more structured format, and carried out some changes accordingly.
This still has to be printed on an A4 format, but no longer uses both sides of the sheet, but has been compressed into one side of the A4 sheet.

Thumbnail: 
daily planner thumbnail.JPG
Usage advice: 

As usual, this daily planner is best combined with a weekly review system, when one or two weekly goals which will be concentrated on are identified. This daily planner will take 10 mins or so to fill up the night before or in the morning before starting the day.

My weekly review system is an involved process, so please let me know if anybody feels interested at all to have look at it, will post it then.

Paper size: 
A4
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Microsoft Word
Language: 
English

MY PLANNER

This template is a one week per page to fit into a regular 3 hole binder. I thought I would share it if anyone was interested. You fill in the dates by hand. It is in Microsoft Word.

Usage advice: 

One week is listed per page in my planner. It has a section for dated activites, Big Rocks, a list of To Do's with started and completed areas and Notes.

It is set up to use similar to the Harvard System. I found the Harvard notebooks to be too complicated and the spaces too small for my usage. But the principle is the same. Under each date there are lines set up for each hour, and each hour is broken into 15 minute blocks. If you choose to do an action at a certain time, you list the number or letter of the action in the square under the date instead of entering the whole item on the line.

Paper size: 
Letter and A4
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
word
Language: 
english

Weekly Calendar with Planning Page

In my calendars I like some kind of long range RADAR, typically in form of small monthly thumbnails.
Some weeks ago I saw a design, where the current month is like a ruler at the bottom of a left page and the next month is at the bottom of the right page. Based on my sweetheart calendar I made a proof of concept. The whole week is lefthand and planning space is on the right side. The current week is shaded in the ruler for accentuation.

Thumbnail: 
Thumb.jpg
Usage advice: 

In the first table you set the starting date in cell A1. The rest is dead simple. The only tricky thing is setting the margins for the individual printer. Or make a direct export to pdf and do the scaling with Adobe Reader.

Paper size: 
A5
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
OpenOffice; Used font: Andale Sans
Language: 
German, but should also work with localized OpenOffice

Dynamic Templates v2.05: The Next Generation

The D*I*Y Planner Dynamic Template application has now hit version 2.0, ready to produce any size and shape of yearly, monthly, weekly, and daily calendars for your printing pleasure. All designs are based upon the Classic versions of the D*I*Y Planner, along with input from Doug, and so will integrate completely into your DiyP setup. (The daily design was created by Doug, but was never implemented as a static template owing to the insane amount of repetitive work required.)

Simply select your paper size, choose the calendar type, and tweak the settings to come up with your own printable set of calendars that perfectly fit your planner and your lifestyle.

The Mac version was built in Mac OS 10.4.11, using Qt 4.5.2
Here's a shot of the Mac version as it starts up:

Listy Planner (Classic)

For those who balance school, work, home/family and personal matters -- and love to do so by making lists -- this template combines list-making with a weekly planner page. This is my first attempt at a template, so suggestions are welcome.

Thumbnail: 
Picture 2.png
Usage advice: 

The page is 2-up and when you print/cut/punch, your holes will go through some of the lines on the template. I decided that I wanted more room to write overall, so sacrificed a little bit of the layout for that.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Adobe PDF Reader
Language: 
English

DIY mini file folders for 3x5 notecards

Being profoundly frustrated by the fact that the Levenger notecard folders don't fit in regular 3x5 notecard boxes and inspired by the 4x6 floder template from Vale Design lauded by Lifehacker.com, I made my own template for 3x5 folders that fit!

Usage advice: 

Simply print on your favorite decorative paper or card stock. Cut along the full lines and fold along the hashed line (a bone folder will help there). That's it.

Paper size: 
Index Card (3 x 5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Any pdf reader such as Acrobat, Apple Preview or FoxIt
Language: 
N/A

Another Amazing Renaissance Art Giveaway

Once again, Renaissance Art is promoting another random product giveaway on their blog. This time, the item up for grabs is a prototype 3x5 ring binder.

...one of our new versatile 3 x 5 one-inch ring binders ($20). Leather lined (no suede side showing), these hand-held helpers hold about 80 cards (if the cardstock is a super-sturdy acid-free100 brightness 100# cardstock), more with other company’s lighter card stock, and will come in every color we offer: rustic brown and black and all seven Rustic Elegance colors. And the exposed rings don’t just look good—they help the covers stay flat.

To enter in the giveaway, all you need to do is go on over to the Renaissance Art blog and leave a comment at THIS POST.

Free Giveaway from Renaissance Art

Our friends at Renaissance Art are doing weekly giveaways. This week's item happens to be especially droolworthy.

Leave a comment to THIS POST to enter your name for the random drawing. You could be the owner of a prototype of one of their new discbound cover lines. This cranberry red leather cover fits a 8.5" X 5.5", 3/4" disc discbound notebook. It has 2 extra interior pockets and a pen loop. The link also has a picture of the prize, so be sure to go read and check it out.

Arthur has this to say about the new covers:

The new line will be fun, innovative and while elegant, not the same ole corporate looking stuff everyone else is carrying. PLUS... it is made right here in our Santa Fe, NM studios and not at some overseas factory in China. So, you know the quality will be superior and...since we make everything to order you will be able to TWEAK it.

Sometimes you get a little thirsty.

Well Maiden, Dover Collection

"When the well's dry, we know the worth of water." - Benjamin Franklin

I used to store a lot of my articles-in-progress in Google Docs so I could work on them from any computer, but lately I've migrated most of them into regular ole' text files that sync amongst all my laptops using Dropbox (even my Linux boxes). That way I can edit HTML text in Emacs or TextMate, keep graphics and photos handy, and easily organize them in a logical directory structure. The system is working quite well, but it assumes that I have a decent memory for all those things that came before. (I don't. This is why I write things down.)

I was working on a rather involved article this long weekend. Despite my exhaustion at the time and the complexity of its structure, the words and the shaping of the concepts came quite freely. So much so, that I was feeling quite proud of myself. I was about three-quarters of the way through the rough draft when I said out loud, "This is going unbelievably well. It's almost like I wrote it before...." I paused. I thought about what I just....

Well... erm... that is... *cough*.

What I wrote was basically a carbon-copy of my old Simpleton and the Grail post from my much-fallow a million monkeys typing blog. In my defense, it was four years ago, and it didn't show up in my DIYPlanner.com search.

But the experience begs a question: am I just recycling myself? I know that some of us here tend to drift towards the same themes again and again (a lament I've heard Merlin bemoan on several occasions), and maybe those well-travelled paths form ruts that allow the carriage-driver to fall asleep at the reins, knowing that the horse knows the way. Sometimes it's hard to keep up the energy needed to spend a few hours writing when the scenery is the same.

To that end, I'm looking for ideas. What sort of articles would you like to see here on DIYPlanner? What reviews, what techniques, what products, what angles should we pursue?

Please tell us what you'd like to see, no matter how small, how grandiose, how wacky, how insignificant, or how out-of-place it might seem. Let's refill the well of our inspiration. Leave us your ideas.