Notebooks & Stationery

2009 Dated Weekly Calendar (2-up) English

This is an English translation of the excellent French Calendar (2-up) that Celie submitted earlier this year.

Usage advice: 

Print Double-sided, either auto or manual, and cut down the middle.

Paper size: 
Classic (5.5 x 8.5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
PDF Reader
Language: 
English

Paper size comparison chart

This helped me to get a handle on the different paper sizes.

Usage advice: 

Reference use

Paper size: 
Multiple Sizes
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Open office, perhaps other word processors
Language: 
English

Review: Myndology Bare Notebooks

Myndology Bare NotebooksEvery now and then I get a notebook that's a joy to use. It could be for many reasons, including paper quality, design, sizing, ease of use, uncommon personal preferences, ideology, loyalty or --yes-- even the buy-in from marketing and advertising. Since I actually work in a marketing firm, I like to think I'm more skeptical in this regard than most, but the rest of the qualities can coalesce into a notebook that's a real pleasure to write in. The hunt for such a beast continues daily, and each week I try another handful.

When Jason from Myndology offered to send me a few samples of their "Bare" line of notebooks, I hadn't very high hopes. In fact, because they were designed from the ground up to be "environmentally responsible," I was prepared for the worst. Several other recycled products sent to me for review have barely seen a line of ink before I passed them off to other less demanding users. Most of them are fountain pen unfriendly (to say the least), with excessive bleeding to the point where I can't use an overleaf. Glued bindings often become unstuck, the fibres of cover and paper start to fall apart in damp air, and some earthy but impractical thing gets in my way, e.g., a scratchy hemp bookmark, a brittle dried flower, or --heaven forbid-- an actual acorn or pine cone hot-glued to the front. Plus, the design generally falls into one of two categories: recycled book covers (usually random, but you're more likely to get a low-budget Harlequin knockoff than "A Farewell to Arms"); or a piece of cardboard that looks like the back of a cheap steno pad. Given past experience, and that Myndology is currently a sponsor of DIYPlanner.com, I was a little concerned that writing a Bare review might prove precarious....

What's your personal kit?

RenArt Moleskine+3x5In my post about my workplace gear, I noted that there had been a certain divergence between the gear I use in the office and the gear I use for my own personal and creative time. Essentially, the office gear is quite polished and uses a Circa system as a base, complete with fancy zip folio and plenty of DIYP forms, while my personal gear is far more... raw.

I've always maintained that structure is important when you have a lot to take on and keep organized, and having a well-built planner (whether digital or analogue) is key to that. But --although my home life does require some degree of organisation-- it's far less than the myriad projects I have to manage for work. In fact, some simple to-do lists and a calendar is about all I need, along with the occasional contact look-up. Thus, part of my kit is a few DiyP HipsterPDA Action cards and a month-view calendar. I copy down pertinent appointments and to-do items so that I can ferry them and sync with my other planner and online tools as needed.

A far bigger concern for me is creativity. Now, creativity comes in many forms, and that's one of the reasons why I created the DiyP Creative Pack, which is a separate pack in Classic and integrated into the HipsterPDA size pack. Having those prompts can help you manage plots, devise (and remember) characters, keep tabs on story props (like that elusive Holy Grail you keep losing), shuffle your storyboards (did Han shoot before or after?), and otherwise structure your ideas. So, part two of my kit: a selection of DiyP creative cards, which may vary according to the project I'm concentrating on.

Doane Paper Style Notecard

Doane paper (available at doanepaper.com) is the perfect fusion of note paper and graph paper. I have been using Doane Paper for most of my note taking for the past year, as have many people around the web. Of course, we can't always have a letter-sized pad handy at all times. So I set out to create a note card sized version of Doane Paper.

This note card has lines every quarter of an inch (allowing generous writing space) and grid lines every eighth of an inch. The result is a single notecard that is both a lined note card and a graph paper note card.

Finally, this card features a 1/8" margin all the way around the card, allowing for a markings to the side of your writing/drawing.

Thumbnail: 
doaneStyleCard.png
Usage advice: 

This note card is best printed using a color printer. I have posted a one up version of this card.

The writing lines are perfect for note taking and the grid lines make it easy to draw other forms, or just keep everything lined up.

Paper size: 
Index Card (3 x 5)
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Acrobat reader, or any other PDF reader
Language: 
NA

Cornell Notes Word template

In response to a request in this thread: LINK I made this template. It's a quick and dirty Word template for writing Cornell-note style. There are no headers, titles, etc. Just a blank document with the lines.

The one trick that this pony has is that you can type multiple pages, and st ay within the confines of the main body area. The first page has added text fields for the summary and comments sections, but those don't carry through to added pages. I couldn't figure out how to do that part, and they are just text boxes anyway, which are easy enough to add.

I didn't make an OpenOffice document, but can convert it if there's a demand for it. Post in the comments if you are interested.

Thumbnail: 
thumbnail.png
Usage advice: 

The best thing to do is to open the file, delete the text, and resave the document as a Word template in your preferred location. Saving as a template should be easy. When you change the format in the "Save as..." window, Word should open your Templates directory for you.

As for writing, just type. To add items into the left and bottom margin, you just add a text box and type.

Paper size: 
Letter
License: 
Creative Commons
Applications required: 
Microsoft Word (and possibly Open Office)
Language: 
none and all